Absoluty free phone sex

Rated 3.90/5 based on 755 customer reviews

I later got so spacey, shaky and weak I needed to go back to bed, but first I dabbed a tiny bit on my throat so there'd be something good while feeling bad.

That's the only time I've gone back to bed while feeling sick as a dog and smiling!

It is also the perfect companion for cigarettes and heady drinks, though those kinds of nightclubs are nearing extinction in my corner of the world. It's like someone put an incensy, balsamic top over a 1970's aldehyde/ vetiver base. My vintage bottle got YSL perfume corps label on it, probably one of the first formulations. I was able to find an affordable one from the mid 90s, similar to the tall bottle above.

In the opening I get about a minute of overripe bananas, then spice rack, and in somewhere between 15 minutes and half an hour (depending on if I'm writhing around getting all hot and bothered or just sitting at the computer), I can actually detect nuances. It smells of late nights at a desk with a bakelite phone, thick-rimmed glasses and a typewriter, followed by a hedonistic excursion when the sounds of the night outside become too enticing to ignore. It practically lives on the skin, undulating in rich radiant waves of oriental spice and resins. It really makes me stand up straighter, and speak a little louder. Very indolic; sexy but not skanky, like warm, musky skin. Almost the most magical scent for me among the thousands of scents that I've smelt. I am looking to purchase ANY vintage Opium, Youth Dew, Cinnabar or Dior Poison-ALL MUST BE VINTAGE!!! Message me and let me know what you have and asking price. If I should say just one fact about Opium 1977 /the most important one/, I have to mention that this perfume is so invasive and absorbing that it makes you believe this scent has become an integral part of your bloodstream. The version I have is less round and less animalic, very much more incense.

Opium (1977) by Yves Saint Laurent is a Oriental Spicy fragrance for women. Opium (1977) was created by Jean Amic, Jean-Louis Sieuzac and Raymond Chaillan.

Top notes are coriander, plum, citruses, mandarin orange, pepper, jasmine, cloves, west indian bay and bergamot; middle notes are carnation, sandalwood, patchouli, cinnamon, orris root, peach, lily-of-the-valley and rose; base notes are labdanum, tolu balsam, sandalwood, opoponax, musk, coconut, vanilla, benzoin, vetiver, incense, cedar, myrrh, castoreum and amber.

She held a good-sized bottle on the flat palm of her hand, near her solar plexus.

Madame Lombard was nonplussed - she liked the image, the French on it, and the designer well enough, but the name was met with strong disapproval.

I happily sniffed at it (w/o opening it) many times.I have a bottle from the early 90s, and I am sure it hardly compares to the original,it is a beauty nonetheless.Initially it started with aldehydes, now my bottle has lost much of its top notes.I do hope she smiled again when it finally came down.Madame Lombard, you were the best French teacher Ever, and Opium is like no other scent - Ever.

Leave a Reply